I am currently not in a position, due to excess colony numbers, to offer a swarm removal service for this current season 2019... Sorry

Irish Times Reports Monday September 3rd 2018 

" Irish honey among world’s healthiest, study finds"

Removal of Swarm of Bees, Colony of Bees

Common Bumblebee

Video of Honeybee swarm arriving into a Baithive

We provide a service only in relation to Honeybee Swarm and Colony removal. Not Removal of Bumblebee or Wasps nests.

Ideally a recently arrived Swarm of Honeybee's needs to be removed ASAP before they locate into a cavity to set up permanent home.

Once they do this we cannot guarantee their removal, if located in a cavity they would have to be assessed on an individual basis to see if removal from the cavity is possible.

 

What to do if you suspect you have a Swarm of Honeybees that have recently arrived, or a Colony of Honeybees that have taken up nesting in a cavity space in a Building or Tree etc. ?

 

Honeybees : If you suspect it is a Swarm of Honeybees, first off, check if they are as the picture of the " Honeybee Swarm " below. As in they are together after arriving in a tight cluster hanging or clinging to a structure, bush etc.

If so, it is a Swarm of Honeybees.

.They are not aggressive, and contrary to general belief are not " Attacking Killer Bees " . They are relatively harmless.( See Below Videos to illustrate this ). They have no nest yet to defend, and are defensive. Honeybees and Bumblebees are a protected species, they must not, and do not need to be exterminated by a pest control company. It is important to try and get them collected before they locate into their final destination, for example into a roof cavity, cavity in a wall or in a chimney. Then it is a very different proposition to remove them, it involves invasive works in relation to removing, if possible, outer building facade to acess the swarm and remove them. An extreme example I carried out was a removal of a colony in a chimney in a house that was about to be demolished. It necessitated me and a trusty lump hammer and a lot of debris, but the colony were removed and went on to prosper 

Bumblebees : If Bumblebees they will not have arrived as a Swarm, but will have set up a nest in a cavity. Identify as below and leave alone if not close to person's/public, they are generally never aggressive.

 

Wasps:  As Bumblebees they will not arrive as a swarm, Identify as below, if nest is near person's/public they may have to be removed by a specialist pest control company, if not in the vicinity of persons/public they can e left to get on with their business.  

Common Wasp

Common Wasp: Vespa Sp.

Wasps Nest

Common wasp

 

 

Like the Honeybees is a vital part of our delicate ecosystem, keeping insects that would normally eat plants in your garden such as caterpillars etc in check.

The Queen newly mated from the previous summer will emerge from her slumber as the temperatures rise in spring, and look for a spot to set up home. She is the only one of last years colony, plus other hibernating queens to survive the winter, unlike Honeybees.

 

She will set up home and that can be anywhere from a roof space to a hollow in a tree, to inside your nice dry garage. 

The first sign you may see is a delicate grey small paper like nest structure, made from chewed wood pulp mixed with saliva drying to the above. If left unchecked this will grow in size and will eventually house approximately 3000 to 6000 thousand active wasps.

If this nest is found it is best left to experts to remove , if it is anywhere that is, in close proximity to people and their is a real risk of getting stung. If it is somewhere where people will not be in contact with them as in an isolated location they can be left, and they all will die away naturally after the first autumn frosts, with only the newly mated queens surviving to disperse to setup new nests in different locations.

The old nest will cease to be viable and will be abandoned.

Small Heading
Video of Swarm arriving into to my Bait Hive

Bumblebees: Bombus Spp.

Red Tailed Bumblebee

 

 

Again like the Honeybees, they are a vital part of our delicate ecosystem, pollinating multitudes of different fruiting plants.

The Queen newly mated from the previous summer will emerge from her slumber as the temperatures rise in spring, and look for a spot to set up home. She is the only one of last years colony, plus other hibernating queens to survive the winter, unlike Honeybees.

 

She will set up home usually at ground level, anywhere from under a shed, a disused mouse hole, to another favourite spot, a nice cosy compost heap.

The first sign you may see is a large fat Queen on a Spring Day out looking for a suitable nest site, buzzing close to the ground scouting out crevices and disused mouse holes. Also they can be seen at this early stage collecting the first available Pollen and Nectar, as yet they have no workers ( Unlike the Honeybee who has a depleted workforce ) to do this for her.

Bumblebees will not sting unless threatened, they will only sting if their nest was attacked, otherwise they will happily Bumble about their business of collecting Pollen and Nectar in a fascinating industrious fashion !. 

 

If this nest is found and it is in very close proximity to where people will be, and said people are not comfortable to let them stay in situ. Then it is best left to experts to remove. If it is somewhere where people will not be in contact with them as in an isolated location they can be left, and they all will die away naturally after the first autumn frosts, with only the newly mated queens surviving to disperse to setup new nests in different locations.

The old nest will cease to be viable and will be abandoned.

Irish Honeybee: .Apis M. Melliffera

Swarm of Honeybees

 

 

First Off... A Swarm of Bees is not a Threatening Situation.

See above  video of a Swarm arrival in a Bait Hive I had setup. Excuse the Deadpan Narration... not used to the Silverscreen :-) .

 

Though understandably if a Swarm of Bees suddenly arrives and is hanging out of your Patio table or elsewhere , they will have to be moved.

 

If it is a Swarm of Bees ( see above photo ) it is necessary to call an experienced beekeeper to remove these. they can be removed, brought away and placed in a hive, and with a lot of specialist care, brought on to be a healthy colony of bees.

If it is a colony of bees that have already setup a nest in a cavity / space somewhere it is more complicated. Again a Beekeeper needs to be contacted. Honeybees are a protected species and under legislation, and rightly so, cannot be exterminated.

A Beekeeper can in certain instances, depending on where they are, remove them and rehouse them as described above.

Irish Honeybee

Honeybee

©2016 By Leinster Honey.